Minnows, Carps and Suckers

Cypriniformes
Minnows, Carps and Suckers in Alabama


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This is a phylogentic listing of the Cypriniformes in Alabama.  A species or group of interest may be found by holding the control key and typing "f" and the name of the species or group of interest.  This listing contains a hyperlink to a detailed description of the fish (if available), a very short description of where the fish is found and its conservation status.  To go directly to a listing of the descriptions available, go to Fish in Alabama.

Order Cypriniformes
Carps and Minnows - Family Cyprinidae

Largescale Stoneroller Campostoma oligolepis. Widespread and locally abundant in headwaters, streams, and small rivers in the Mobile River Basin and Tennessee River drainage; more common above the Fall Line. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Bluefin Stoneroller Campostoma pauciradii. Endemic to Chattahoochee River tributaries but spotty in distribution, and occurring in low numbers above the Fall Line in the Halawakee, Wacoochee, and Uchee Creek systems. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Goldfish Carassius auratus. A non-native introduced species found sporadically throughout the state. Exotic.

Rosyside Dace Clinostomus funduloides. A colorful stream-dwelling species found in cooler streams of the Tennessee River drainage, mainly in the Highland Rim. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Grass Carp Ctenopharyngodon idella. A species native to Southeast Asia, but introduced into ponds throughout Alabama for aquatic weed control. Escapees found regularly in rivers and impoundments throughout the state. Exotic.

Blue Shiner Cyprinella caerulea. Endemic to the Mobile Basin, uncommonly found in a few flowing streams of the Coosa River system. Evidence suggests it has been extirpated in the Cahaba River. Listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. HIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Alabama Shiner Cyprinella callistia. Endemic to the Mobile River Basin. Ubiquitous and locally abundant in streams and flowing rivers above the Fall Line and sporadically in the Coastal Plain. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Bluestripe Shiner Cyprinella callitaenia. An iridescent shiner infrequently found in streams, impounded stream mouths, and the main channel of the Chattahoochee River. Populations may have declined in recent years. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Whitetail Shiner Cyprinella galactura. Widespread in Tennessee River streams where it can be locally abundant. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Tallapoosa Shiner Cyprinella gibbsi. Occurs widely in smaller streams of the Tallapoosa River system above the Fall Line. Low Conservation Concern.

Red Shiner Cyprinella lutrensis. This aggressive shiner became established in the Coosa and Chattahoochee Rivers sometime in the 1960s. Exotic.

Spotfin Shiner Cyprinella spiloptera. Widespread, common, and sometimes locally abundant throughout streams in the Tennessee River drainage. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Tricolor Shiner Cyprinella trichroistia. A colorful shiner common in the Coosa and Cahaba River systems. Most frequently found in small streams above the Fall Line, in a few tributaries to the Alabama River, and a few tributaries to the upper Black Warrior River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Blacktail Shiner Cyprinella venusta. This very hardy shiner is widespread and common throughout the lower three-fourths of Alabama and has recently invaded the Tennessee River drainage via the Tennessee-Tombigee Waterway. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Steelcolor Shiner Cyprinella whipplei. More common in larger waters of the Tennessee drainage, with a well-established population in Mulberry Fork of Black Warrior River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Common Carp Cyprinus carpio. Introduced to American waters in the 1870s from Europe and now found in all major rivers of the state. Exotic.

Spotfin Chub Erimonax monachus. A Tennessee River drainage endemic last collected in Alabama in 1937. Listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Extirpated.

Streamline Chub Erimystax dissimilis. An uncommon, shoal-inhabiting species, found only in the Shoal Creek, Elk River, and Paint Rock River systems of the Tennessee Valley. HIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Blotched Chub Erimystax insignis. More widespread throughout the Tennessee River Valley and generally more abundant than the streamline chub. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Flame Chub Hemitremia flammea. A dazzling chub restricted to limestone spring-runs and small headwater tributaries throughout the Tennessee River Valley. Most commonly encountered in the Highland Rim, and in a few Coosa River springs. Low Conservation Concern.

Cypress Minnow Hybognathus hayi. Pools and backwater sloughs of main river channels in the Mobile River Basin and the larger coastal rivers are preferred by this uncommon minnow. Possibly extirpated from the Tennessee River drainage. Low Conservation Concern.

Mississippi Silvery Minnow Hybognathus nuchalis. A common and sometimes locally abundant inhabitant of the lower Alabama and Tombigbee River systems. Apparently extirpated in the Tennessee River drainage in Alabama. Low Conservation Concern.

Bigeye Chub Hybopsis amblops. Clear, flowing, silt-free streams in the Tennessee River Valley are preferred by this widespread and fairly common chub. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Lined Chub Hybopsis lineapunctata. Upland streams of modest flow in the Tallapoosa River and upper Coosa River systems are frequented by this bottom-dwelling chub. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Clear Chub Hybopsis winchelli. A straw-colored chub frequently found in a variety of Coastal Plain aquatic habitats in the Mobile River Basin with a few populations above the Fall Line, and in the Escatawpa River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Coastal Chub Hybopsis sp. cf. winchelli. This undescribed cousin of the Clear Chub is common in coastal drainages from the Perdido River east to the Chattahoochee River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Silver Carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix. This cultured native of eastern Asia is rarely encountered in state waters. Exotic.

Bighead Carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis. Another cultured native of eastern Asia occasionally found in Alabama rivers. Exotic.

Striped Shiner Luxilus chrysocephalus. A widespread and sometimes abundant species found in small to moderate-sized streams throughout the Mobile River Basin and Tennessee River drainage. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Warpaint Shiner Luxilus coccogenis. This uniquely colored species prefers cooler stream waters of Shoal and Cypress Creeks in Lauderdale County, and in headwater streams of Lookout Creek in DeKalb County. Low Conservation Concern.

Bandfin Shiner Luxilus zonistius. A widespread and locally abundant species found in small to moderate tributaries of the Chattahoochee and Tallapoosa Rivers in eastern Alabama. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Warrior Shiner Lythrurus alegnotus. This upland cousin of the pretty shiner is endemic to the upper Black Warrior River system above the Fall Line. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Blacktip Shiner Lythrurus atrapiculus. This delicate shiner is a common forage species in streams throughout the Coastal Plain of southeastern Alabama, from the Conecuh River east to the Chattahoochee River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Pretty Shiner Lythrurus bellus. Ubiquitous and common throughout the Mobile River Basin below the Fall Line and penetrating upland in the Cahaba and Tallapoosa Rivers. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Scarlet Shiner Lythrurus fasciolaris. A strikingly colored fish common in flowing waters throughout the Tennessee River drainage. Has invaded the upper Locust Fork system. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Ribbon Shiner Lythrurus fumeus. This lackluster shiner is found in streams of lowland or disturbed character in Franklin, Colbert, and Lauderdale Counties in the Tennessee River drainage. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Mountain Shiner Lythrurus lirus. This bronze-colored shiner is uncommon in clear, small to moderate streams of good quality in the Coosa River system, and the Tennessee River drainage where it occurs commonly in the Paint Rock River system. Low Conservation Concern.

Cherryfin Shiner Lythrurus roseipinnis. A small, dusky fish found in small tributaries of the extreme lower Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers, the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta, and the Escatawpa River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Shoal Chub Macrhybopsis hyostoma. This rare chub is known only from the Elk River main channel near the Tennessee state line. HIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Undescribed Chubs Macrhybopsis sp. cf. aestivalis. Two forms occur in the Mobile River Basin and only are found in larger free-flowing streams and rivers. Low Conservation Concern.

Florida Chub Macrhybopsis sp. cf. aestivalis. The coastal form prefers large sand and gravel shoals typical of the Conecuh, Choctawhatchee, and Yellow Rivers. Low Conservation Concern.

Silver Chub Macrhybopsis storeriana. This large minnow is common in larger streams, rivers, and impoundments of the Mobile River Basin below the Fall Line and in the Tennessee River drainage. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Bluehead Chub Nocomis leptocephalus. This nest builder is widespread and common in smaller streams throughout the Coastal Plain of the Mobile River Basin, yet surprisingly absent in Black Belt streams. Also widespread in the Tallapoosa system above the Fall Line and occurs in Bear Creek in the Tennessee River system and upper Sipsey Fork. Lowest Conservation Concern.

River Chub Nocomis micropogon. Found sporadically in Tennessee Valley creeks and streams particularly during the spring breeding season. Low Conservation Concern.

Golden Shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas. A popular bait bucket minnow found through-out the state in all drainages, preferring sluggish pools and streams. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Palezone Shiner Notropis albizonatus. This rare shiner is known only from clear tributaries with excellent water quality in the upper Paint Rock River system. Listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. HIGHEST CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Orangefin Shiner Notropis ammophilus. Easily recognized by its bright orange fins, this sand-loving shiner is widespread and abundant in most streams and rivers in the Mobile River Basin Coastal Plain. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Popeye Shiner Notropis ariommus. Last collected in Alabama during the 1880s from Cypress Creek near Florence. Recently collected in the Elk River system north of the Alabama-Tennessee state line. Extirpated.

Burrhead Shiner Notropis asperifrons. A Mobile River Basin endemic that prefers small, upland streams above the Fall Line. A relict population occurs in the lower Alabama River tributaries in the Lime Hills region. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Emerald Shiner Notropis atherinoides. Sand bars and shoals along main river channels in the Mobile River Basin and Tennessee River drainage are preferred habitat for this widespread and common species. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Rough Shiner Notropis baileyi. Abundant in the Mobile River Basin below the Fall Line, penetrates upland habitats in the upper Sipsey Fork, Tallapoosa River, and Bear Creek of the Tennessee drainage. Absent in sluggish, turbid Black Belt streams. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Bigeye Shiner Notropis boops. Occurs uncommonly in clear streams of the Tennessee River drainage and may be locally abundant in preferred habitat. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Silverjaw Minnow Notropis buccatus. This widespread and common minnow of Alabama’s Coastal Plain is characterized by its unique head morphology. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Ghost Shiner Notropis buchanani. Status in Alabama poorly known. Likely common prior to impoundment of the Tennessee River, but now limited to impounded backwaters and flowing sections of the Elk River. HIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Cahaba Shiner Notropis cahabae. Thought to be endemic to the Cahaba River main channel where it occurred only sporadically and in low numbers; however, discovery of a larger population in the Locust Fork system in 1998 doubled its known distribution. Listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. HIGHEST CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Silverside Shiner Notropis candidus. Main river channels below the Fall Line are home to this abundant endemic species of the Mobile River Basin. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Ironcolor Shiner Notropis chalybaeus. Status in Alabama poorly known. Typically few in number when found and sporadically distributed in coastal streams across southern Alabama. HIGHEST CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Rainbow Shiner Notropis chrosomus. Exquisitely colored during breeding season. Prefers small, clear streams and spring runs in the Cahaba and Coosa River systems, with isolated populations in the lower Alabama and Black Warrior River systems, and a few records from Tennessee River tributaries. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Dusky Shiner Notropis cummingsae. Status in Alabama poorly known. Low-gradient blackwater-like streams in the Uchee Creek system of the Chattahoochee River drainage and one stream in the Chipola River system are preferred by this delicate shiner. HIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Fluvial Shiner Notropis edwardraneyi. Like the silverside shiner, this abundant shiner is confined to main river channels in the Mobile River Basin below the Fall Line. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Redeye Chub Notropis harperi. A spring-dwelling species with a spotty distribution from the Conecuh River east to the Chattahoochee River. Often abundant when found. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Highscale Shiner Notropis hypsilepis. Limited distribution in Alabama and found commonly in only a few Piedmont tributaries to the Chattahoochee River. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Tennessee Shiner Notropis leuciodus. One of Alabama’s more colorful shiners during the breeding season. Locally common in clear, cool streams of Shoal Creek and Paint Rock River systems. Low Conservation Concern.

Longnose Shiner Notropis longirostris. Large schools can be found over shifting sand shoals in Alabama’s coastal streams from the Escatawpa River east to the Chattahoochee River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Taillight Shiner Notropis maculatus. The exquisite taillight shiner is occasionally found in swampy, mud-bottomed backwaters of Coastal Plain rivers and large tributaries. Its perceived rarity can be attributed to sampling difficulty in its preferred habitat. Low Conservation Concern.

Blackmouth Shiner Notropis melanostomus. Discovered in Bay Minette Creek, Baldwin County in April 2003 and since confirmed by other researchers. HIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Highland Shiner Notropis micropteryx. Found occasionally in Tennessee River streams. Acquires a light raspberry flush during the breeding season. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Coastal Shiner Notropis petersoni. Only found in small tributaries to the Mobile-Tensaw Delta, Mobile Bay, and in small streams bordering the Alabama-Florida state line. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Silver Shiner Notropis photogenis. Once thought rare in Alabama. Has been found at several new locations in the Tennessee River Valley, preferring the clear, flowing waters in Shoal Creek and the Elk River. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Silverstripe Shiner Notropis stilbius. Common and abundant in the Mobile River Basin most frequently above the Fall Line. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Telescope Shiner Notropis telescopus. Fairly common and somewhat widespread throughout the Tennessee Valley with good populations found in the clear waters of Shoal Creek, Paint Rock River, and Bear Creek. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Weed Shiner Notropis texanus. Perhaps one of the most widespread and common fishes in Alabama’s Coastal Plain, it has recently invaded the Tennessee River through the Tennessee-Tombigee Waterway. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Skygazer Shiner Notropis uranoscopus. This unique Mobile Basin endemic is restricted in distribution, but sometimes abundant in the flowing main channels and larger tributaries of the Cahaba and lower Tallapoosa Rivers below the Fall Line. Once occurred in the lower Alabama River, but now appears to be extirpated there. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Mimic Shiner Notropis volucellus. This taxonomically complex species group is widespread but usually uncommon when found in streams throughout the Tennessee River drainage and Mobile River Basin. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Channel Shiner Notropis wickliffi. Scattered across the Tennessee River Valley preferring impounded backwaters, stream mouths, and pooled areas in larger streams. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Coosa Shiner Notropis xaenocephalus. Prefers clear upland streams of the Coosa and Tallapoosa River systems. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Sawfin Shiner Notropis sp. cf. spectrunculus. This attractive shiner is common in cool, clear streams with clean substrate in the Paint Rock River and Shoal Creek systems of the Tennessee River. Also found in the flowing section of the Elk River. Low Conservation Concern.

Pugnose Minnow Opsopoeodus emiliae. Prefers weedy, sluggish waters of lowland character throughout the Coastal Plain. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Riffle Minnow Phenacobius catostomus. Larger, flowing streams with cobble and gravel in the Cahaba, Coosa, and Tallapoosa River systems are preferred by this terete benthic minnow. Limited populations are found in the lower Alabama and upper Black Warrior systems. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Suckermouth Minnow Phenacobius mirabilis. Common to the upper Mississippi River Basin, but rare in Alabama where it occurs peripherally in the Bear Creek system of the Tennessee River drainage. HIGHEST CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Stargazing Minnow Phenacobius uranops. Uniquely adapted for a riffle existence, this benthic minnow is uncommon in the Tennessee River Valley. Found only in Shoal Creek, Cypress Creek, and the Elk River. HIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Southern Redbelly Dace Phoxinus erythrogaster. One of Alabama’s most colorful minnows preferring small, clear streams and headwaters in the Highland Rim of the Tennessee River drainage. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Bluntnose Minnow Pimephales notatus. Common in the Tennessee River drainage and the Mobile River Basin below the Fall Line, but strangely absent in streams of the Fall Line Hills region. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas. A favorite bait fish, the "toughie" minnow is widespread due to bait-bucket introduction, but it is not particularly common in waters throughout the state. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Bullhead Minnow Pimephales vigilax. A main channel inhabitant in the Tennessee River drainage and Mobile River Basin. Reaches super-abundant numbers in some habitats. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Broadstripe Shiner Pteronotropis euryzonus. This uncommon shiner is an attractive associate of small, clear to blackwater Coastal Plain tributaries of the Chattahoochee River. HIHIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Apalachee Shiner Pteronotropis grandipinnis. This newly redescribed relative of the broadstripe shiner is only found in the southeastern corner of the state in Chipola and Chattahoochee River tributaries. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Sailfin Shiner Pteronotropis hypselopterus. A widespread, locally abundant, coastal stream shiner of southern Alabama distinguished by its azure flanks. Most Choctawhatchee River populations were recently described as the orangetail shiner. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Orangetail Shiner Pteronotropis merlini. A newly described species found in upland reaches of the Choctawhatchee and Pea Rivers. Low Conservation Concern.

Flagfin Shiner Pteronotropis signipinnis. An extraordinarily colored coastal cyprinid preferring small tanin-stained streams, frequently with golden club, that drain forested wetlands in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and the lower Conecuh and Yellow Rivers. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Bluenose Shiner Pteronotropis welaka. This magnificent shiner is widely scattered and uncommon across Alabama’s Coastal Plain. Individuals prefer deep, soft-bottomed, weedy streams and spring runs. Their rarity is no doubt related to the difficulty of sampling their preferred habitat. HIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Blacknose Dace Rhinichthys atratulus. This benthic fish prefers riffles and runs of small, upland headwaters of the Coosa, Black Warrior, and Tennessee Rivers. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Creek Chub Semotilus atromaculatus. The ruling predators in small headwater streams throughout the Mobile River Basin and Tennessee River drainage. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Dixie Chub Semotilus thoreauianus. Widespread but infrequently encountered in Mobile River Basin streams below the Fall Line. Common in Chattahoochee River tributaries near the Fall Line and also found in a few small tributaries in the lower Bear Creek system in Colbert County. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Suckers - Family Catostomidae

River Carpsucker Carpiodes carpio. Infrequently captured in larger tributaries and the main channel of the Tennessee River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Quillback Carpiodes cyprinus. Prefers larger flowing rivers and impoundments generally below the Fall Line in the Mobile River Basin and in the Tennessee River drainage. Populations from the Escambia to the Chattahoochee Rivers represent an undescribed species. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Highfin Carpsucker Carpiodes velifer. Generally more common and abundant than the Quillback. Occupies Mobile Basin rivers and larger tributaries below the Fall Line. Found in the Tennessee River drainage but absent in the Chattahoochee. Populations in the Escambia to the Choctawhatchee Rivers represent an undescribed species. Lowest Conservation Concern.

White Sucker Catostomus commersonii. Prefer cooler, spring-fed headwaters and cave runs in the Tennessee River drainage around the Highland Rim. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Blue Sucker Cycleptus elongatus. An uncommon dweller in large rivers and streams of the Tennessee River Valley. Sampling in preferred habitat with appropriate gear will likely yield additional previously unknown locations. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Southeastern Blue Sucker Cycleptus meridionalis. This hardy sucker roams extensively throughout the lower Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers and the Mobile-Tensaw Delta. Low Conservation Concern.

Creek Chubsucker Erimyzon oblongus. Inhabits low-gradient sandy streams throughout the Tennessee River drainage and Mobile River Basin. Less common above the Fall Line and absent in the upper Tallapoosa River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Lake Chubsucker Erimyzon sucetta. Prefers weedy, silt-bottomed backwaters and streams throughout the Coastal Plain. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Sharpfin Chubsucker Erimyzon tenuis. Not commonly found in most of the state, somewhat limited to sandy and weedy streams in the Coastal Plain most frequently in Escatawpa, Perdido, and Mobile River tributaries. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Alabama Hog Sucker Hypentelium etowanum. This camouflaged sucker is perfectly adapted for concealment in rocky, gravelly streams in the Mobile River Basin, most frequently above the Fall Line, and in Fall Line tributaries to the Chattahoochee River. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Northern Hog Sucker Hypentelium nigricans. Occurs in many habitat types throughout the Tennessee River drainage, from impoundments to small headwater streams. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Smallmouth Buffalo Ictiobus bubalus. The foundation of a significant fishery in main river channels of the Mobile River Basin and the Tennessee River drainage. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Bigmouth Buffalo Ictiobus cyprinellus. Restricted to the Tennessee River drainage, this large riverine sucker is occasionally encountered in impoundments and large rivers. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Black Buffalo Ictiobus niger. Found throughout impoundments and larger rivers and streams in the Tennessee River Valley. Larger adults have a deep blue color and local anglers have coined the name "blue rooters" to describe them. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Spotted Sucker Minytrema melanops. Common in a variety of habitats throughout Alabama. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Silver Redhorse Moxostoma anisurum. This moderate-sized sucker resembles the river redhorse but lacks bright red fins, and is found in larger rivers and streams of the Tennessee River drainage. Presumed rarity of this species is likely due to inadequate sampling effort and gear. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Smallmouth Redhorse Moxostoma breviceps. Characterized by a small head, sickle-shaped dorsal fin, and bright red tail. Occurs in streams and impoundments of the Tennessee River drainage. Lowest Conservation Concern.

River Redhorse Moxostoma carinatum. This beautiful bronze sucker is known from moderate to large streams and impoundments in the Mobile River Basin, the Tennessee River drainage, and in the Conecuh River system. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Black Redhorse Moxostoma duquesneii. A small stream sucker common above the Fall Line and in lower Alabama River tributaries. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Golden Redhorse Moxostoma erythrurum. More widespread in Mobile River Basin and Tennessee River drainage streams than the black redhorse. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum. The only known collection in Alabama was from Cypress Creek, Lauderdale County, in 1889. EXTINCT.

Blacktail Redhorse Moxostoma poecilurum. This orange-tailed sucker is widespread and common throughout the Mobile River Basin and coastal rivers. Lowest Conservation Concern.

Apalachicola Redhorse or Grayfin Redhorse Moxostoma sp. cf. poecilurum. This undescribed redhorse is a common inhabitant of low-gradient streams and impoundments in the Chattahoochee River system. Low Conservation Concern.

Greater Jumprock Scartomyzon lachneri. Fairly common in Chattahoochee River tributaries and in impounded waters. Lowest Conservation Concern.


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