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Live-bearing Snails - Family Viviparidae

Live-bearing Snails in Alabama
Order Architaenioglossa

Slender Campeloma Campeloma decampi. Rare. Endemic to small region of Tennessee River drainage in north-central Alabama. Extant in Limestone, Piney, and Round Island Creeks, Limestone County. Occurs both in gravel and soft sediments in slow to moderate current. Listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. HIGHEST CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Pointed Campeloma Campeloma decisum. Fairly common. Widespread in Tennessee River system. Found primarily in soft sediments in slow to moderate current. Low Conservation Concern.

Ovate Campeloma Campeloma geniculum. Poorly known. Endemic to Gulf Coast drainages. Found primarily in soft sediments in slow to moderate current. Moderate Conservation Concern.

Cylinder Campeloma Campeloma regulare. Common. Endemic to Mobile Basin. Found primarily in soft sediments in slow to moderate current. Low Conservation Concern.

Cylindrical Lioplax Lioplax cyclostomaformis. Rare. Endemic to Mobile Basin. Historically found throughout Alabama. Known to still exist in a short reach of Cahaba River. Generally found in soft sediments under boulders in shoal habitats. Listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. HIGHEST CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Furrowed Lioplax Lioplax sulculosa. Poorly known. Restricted to Tennessee River. Found primarily in soft sediments in slow to moderate current. Moderate Conservation Concern.

Tulotoma Tulotoma magnifica. Rare, locally common. Endemic to Mobile Basin. Historically occurred from Coosa River in St. Clair County to Alabama River in Monroe County. Known to be extant in Jordan Dam tailwaters, Coosa River, and six Coosa River tributaries. Generally occurs under cobble and boulders in shoal habitats. Upgraded from endangered, the tulotoma snail is listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. HIGHEST CONSERVATION CONCERN.

Banded Mysterysnail Viviparus georgianus. Common. Presumably found in streams throughout Alabama. Apparently more common in Tennessee River system. Found primarily in soft sediments and detritus in slow current. Low Conservation Concern.

Olive Mysterysnail Viviparus subpurpureus. Common. Apparently restricted to main stem Tennessee River. Found in gravel or soft sediments in slow to swift current. Often found under cobble and boulders. Low Conservation Concern.

Note: In Alabama, it is illegal to release or stock or move any fish, mussel, snail or crayfish to any public waters without a permit.

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