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The Economics of Alabama Anglers

The Economic Impact of Anglers and Hunters in Alabama

Number of Resident Alabama Anglers

Number of Resident Alabama Hunters

Total Expenditures

Total Jobs

Salaries and Wages

Ripple Effect on the Economy

628,000*

312,000*

$702 million*

36,000**

$105 million**

$3.25 billion**

*One in four Alabama anglers are non-residents, but 94% of the days spent fishing were by residents fishing.

National survey shows hunting, fishing and observing wildlife provide economic benefits for Alabama
The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has joined with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in highlighting results from the 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation. According to the survey report, 1.7 million people participated in wildlife-related recreation in the state of Alabama in 2011, generating $2.7 billion for the state’s economy. The Alabama state report measures public participation in hunting, fishing, wildlife viewing and other wildlife-dependent recreation, as well as how much money is spent pursuing these activities. The report is available online at: www.fws.gov/southeast/alabama/economicimpact-al.html.
The survey, conducted every five years by the USFWS and the U.S. Census Bureau, has become one of the most important sources of information on fish and wildlife recreation in the United States. Federal, state, and private organizations use the information in managing wildlife and wildlife-related recreation programs, and in forecasting trends in participation and economic impacts.
Highlighted in the state report is the following:
• $2.7 billion total spent on wildlife-related recreation in Alabama.
• $456 million spent in Alabama from fishing-related activities.
• $913 million spent in Alabama on hunting-related activities.
• $734 million spent in Alabama on wildlife-watching activities.
Complete survey results are available at: http://wsfrprograms.fws.gov/Subpages/NationalSurvey/NatSurveyIndex.htm

State Tax Revenue Information

Sportsmen in Alabama pay $105.2 million in state sales tax, fuel tax, and income taxes. That could pay 2,937 teachers' salaries or fund 17,535 students' annual education costs. Management of fish and wildlife resources receive no General Fund money.  Fishing licenses, hunting licenses and excise taxes pay for the management of fish and wildlife resources.

Jobs

**Sportsmen support 7 times more jobs in Alabama than Auburn University (33,338 jobs vs. 5,300 jobs).


Perspective

  • *Nearly one of every five Alabama residents hunt or fish.
  • **Annual spending in Alabama by recreational anglers is 13 times more than the cash receipts from the state's commercial seafood landings ($858 million vs. $64 million).
  • **Annually, Alabama sportsmen spend four and a half times more than the cash receipts for cattle and calves, the second leading agricultural commodity in Alabama ($1.7 billion vs. $363 million).
  • **Alabama anglers and hunters outnumber the combined populations of Birmingham, Montgomery, Mobile, and Huntsville, the state's four most populated cities ($1.02 milliion vs. 917,000).

    * Numbers for population 16 years old and older from the 2006 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, US Fish and Wildlife Service.
    Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation**Numbers provided courtesy of the Congressional Sportsmens Foundation (202-543-6850) who works on behalf of current and future generations of Americans to protect the right and increase the opportunity to hunt, trap and fish by serving as the sportsmen's link to Congress.

    The 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation is available from the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

    Fishing in America:

    - If fishing were ranked as a corporation, it would be 47 on the 2007 Fortune 500 list of America’s largest companies based on total sales. That’s well ahead of such global giants as Microsoft or Time Warner.

    - At nearly 40 million, the number of American anglers is more than 33 times the average attendance per game at all Major League baseball parks combined.

     - The more than one million jobs supported by anglers are almost three times the number of people who work for United Parcel Service in the U.S.

    - The National Sporting Goods Association ranked fishing sixth out of 42 recreation activities, preceded only by walking, swimming, exercising, camping and bowling.

    Top 10 Fishing States Ranked by Resident Retail Sales

    Florida $4,412,241,741
    Texas $3,366,961,760
    Minnesota $2,832,442,963
    California $2,677,352,981
    Michigan $2,099,582,373
    Pennsylvania $1,794,966,426
    Wisconsin $1,754,539,873
    South Carolina $1,492,735,367
    North Carolina $1,204,118,689
    Missouri $1,179,604,443

    Hunting in America:

    - If hunting were ranked as a corporation, it would fall in the top 20 percent of the Fortune 500 list of America’s largest companies, slightly ahead of such global giants as General Dynamics and Coca-Cola.

    - According to the National Sporting Goods Association, more Americans go hunting than play softball or tennis.

    - The number of U.S. hunters age 16 and over—12.5 million—is about three times the total number of people attending baseball games at Yankee Stadium over a full season.

    - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reports roughly nine percent of all hunters (more than 1.1 million) are female.

    Top 10 Hunting States Ranked by Resident Retail Sales

    Texas

    $2,334,329,825

    Pennsylvania $1,734,082,321
    Wisconsin $1,394,050,097
    Michigan   $1,334,000,075
    Missouri $1,227,087,240
    California  $926,577,638
    Arkansas $877,430,173
    Ohio  $859,321,607
    Alabama $846,607,925
    New York $788,091,714

    Full reports can be downloaded from www.southwickassociates.com under the “free reports” link.  The economic data was produced with the assistance of Federal Aid in Sport fish and Wildlife Restoration funds.

Official Web site of Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
©2008 Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources   |   64 N. Union Street, Suite 468 - Montgomery, Alabama 36130